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Thread: What is the purpose of quality in pathology?

  1. #1
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    What is the purpose of quality in pathology?

    I have opened a thread for us to discuss what we all feel is the purpose/ role of 'quality' within pathology, it would be great if you joined in- regardless of your profession.

    I find that unless I understand how a clause/ reference in both ISO 15189 or GPGs relates back to the patient, staff or safety of the blood supply ( which is basically the patient), then it would feel meaningless, and I would lose the will. Luckily my team are far more persevering and patient than I am . For everything we do I believe we need to understand the 'why' we are meant to do this, and simply stating that it's part of the Standards etc- isn't helpful and contributes to hours of discussions, extra work that has little added value, and is unachievable to maintain.

    Can anyone think of a UKAS Standard or other non-conformance that has been cited, that appears to be somewhat meaningless and that we could discuss. Maybe we could even agree on a standard approach to addressing these issues?

    bw

    Rashmi
    Last edited by Rashmi; 16th Apr 2019 at 10:32 PM.

  2. #2
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    Excellent Thread. Discussions like this are going on all the time at the Research Quality Association, a not-for-profit professional association for quality professionals (www.theRQA.com)

  3. #3
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    Many thanks.
    So, one I have heard about is the supposed need (UKAS) to regularly test patient samples containing known antibodies across analysers within a pathology network.
    Doesn't NEQAS/ EQA testing fulfill this criteria ?

    How can using a patient sample be right?- consider the following:
    • antibody strength is unknown, so may or may not react across the platforms- what does this demonstrate?
    • transport conditions and time could adversely affect the sample, leading to different results between labs.... then we end up having to waste more time addressing this.
    • the patient sample is probably needed in the lab for 7days for issuing blood, and using the plasma may lead to having to re-bleed/re- test the patient.
    • what are the ethics in taking this approach?
    • I gather that other pathology disciplines are even more so distressed in having to do this with their numerous tests


    Some clarification would be helpful. If we understand the rationale, then it might not cause so much angst- but we still need to consider the ethics involved.

    bw

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